All posts filed under: korean food

spicy cold noodles with kimchi

On a hot summer day, it’s nice to have a bowl of cold noodles to cool you down. This dish is easy to whip up if you’re in the mood for something simple and spicy. You can add as much hot red pepper paste as you want depending on how spicy you want it and you can garnish with whatever you have. I did a simple garnish of perilla leaves on top but you can also add cucumbers, radishes & a hard boiled egg. Recipe for Spicy Cold Noodles with Kimchi courtesy of: http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2011/07/kimchi-bibim-guksu-spicy-cold-noodles.html#.U2fz3lVdWJk Ingredients: 8 – 10 ounces somyeon (somen) noodles 1 cup thinly sliced kimchi (fully fermented) 1/4 cup juice from kimchi (use a little more soy sauce and vinegar if unavailable) 1 tablespoon Korean red chili pepper paste, gochujang (adjust to taste) 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon corn syrup (use honey or more sugar if unavailable) 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons rice or apple vinegar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon sesame seeds Optional garnish: 4 perilla leaves, kkaennip, thinly sliced …

best hangover soup: Han Bat Sul Long Tang

I am a big fan of LA Eater’s posts. They provide great lists that I follow. I love it everytime they release new lists and it makes me want to go and try the places they recommend. They posted this recent list- 13 beef soups that will make your hangover disappear- which is brilliant and so helpful! However, one restaurant is missing… come on LA Eater, how could you forget the king of all beef soups! Han Bat Sul Long Tang has the BEST beef soup in town, hands down. It is such a simple meal- soup, rice & kimchi & radish but it always hits the spot. And let me tell you, it has saved me several times from the worst hangovers. I don’t know what it is but that first spoonful is always so amazing. It’s weird to be so thankful for a bowl of soup but it’s true. There is no other sul long tang that cures me like Han Bat and I have several friends who agree that they have the …

tofu with stir fried kimchi & pork

I love Korean food so much. I crave it all the time & can eat it everyday… it’s just so good! One of my favorite dishes is tofu with stir fried kimchi & pork aka dubu kimchi. I always want to order it when I see it on menus. I’ve usually made a less fancy version by just cooking kimchi, onions & spam but decided to try a legit recipe this time. Don’t get me wrong- I love a bowl of kimchi & spam but this was pretty amazing. I felt like I was at a restaurant. It’s spicy and delicious and perfect with a bowl of rice. I made a whole pan for myself and ate it again for dinner the next day 🙂 Recipe for Tofu with stir-fried kimchi & pork courtesy of: http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2010/10/dubu-kimchi-tofu-with-stir-fried-kimchi.html#.UUXOFhxnrrw Ingredients: 2 cups fully fermented kimchi 1/2 pound (230 grams) sliced pork or pork belly 1/2 onion 2 scallions 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 …

homemade bi bim bap

Bi bim bap is one of my favorite Korean dishes. You have a little bit of everything in one bowl: veggies, meat, rice, hot sauce. Every bi bim bap bowl is different- it depends what you want in it or what restaurant you go to. Usual ingredients include bean sprouts, spinach, mushrooms, carrots, and some sort of meat. If you are awesome, you could make all the ingredients from scratch but if you are lazy like me, just go to the Korean market and buy the ingredients in the side dish section.. there are some places that have everything packaged and ready to eat! I bought a package of veggies and just poured everything on a bed of rice. I didn’t include meat this time around and added kimchi. Add hot red pepper paste, sesame oil, sesame seeds if desired, and of course, you can’t forget an egg! Some people like a fried egg, some like a raw egg.. whatever you desire. Mix everything together and you’re good to go! Here is a great bi …

my favorite Korean soup: kimchi stew

Kimchi jji gae aka kimchi stew is one of my favorite Korean soups/dishes.. I eat it at restaurants, order it to-go, ask my mom to make it when I go home.. Whenever I’m home, I usually have more than two bowls because Mom’s cooking is always the best. Sadly, sometimes I have to settle with my own version. It’s easy to make though and you can add more ingredients to your liking; ie: more garlic or hot red pepper paste if you like spiciness. One ingredient I recently tried adding was sugar. I was making kimchi stew and my friend Sam said to add sugar. At first, I was like eh??? But I decided to listen to him since he cooks well and it was a nice touch. You don’t have to follow the exact measurements below because honestly, I didn’t measure anything myself- I just threw however much I wanted into the pot and you can always add more of something after you taste. You can also add different meats like pork belly or …

Homemade hwe dup bab

What is hwe dup bab you ask? It is one of my favorite dishes: a Korean sashimi rice bowl that includes sliced sashimi, vegetables & a spicy chili pepper paste. You can get creative and add whatever ingredients you desire but the basic ingredients you need are: rice, a variety of sashimi, red leaf lettuce, sliced cucumbers & carrots, perilla leaves, seaweed, sesame oil & chili pepper paste. You can choose your favorite sashimi- I used tuna & salmon. The sashimi package also included some salmon roe & sliced radish so it was perfect! For veggies, instead of carrots, I used Japanese gobo root. You can also add sliced red onions, red cabbage, sprouts. I have seen some recipes that use sliced apples or pears too. Depending on how spicy you like things, you can add as much chili pepper paste as you want. It is so good, I want more! 🙂 Ingredients: cooked rice sliced sashimi chopped red leaf lettuce thinly sliced cucumber thinly sliced carrots sliced perilla leaves chili pepper paste (kochujang or …

Korean military soup

Thank you Wikipedia for this description of Korean military soup aka budae jji gae: Budae jjigae is a type of jjigae (a thick Korean soup similar to a Western stew). Soon after the Korean War, food was scarce in Seoul, South Korea. Some people made use of surplus foods from U.S. Army bases around the Uijeongbu area, Pyeongtaek area or Munsan area, such as hot dogs, canned ham, and Spam, and incorporated them into a traditional spicy soup flavored with gochujang (red chili paste) and kimchi. Budae jjigae is still popular in South Korea. The dish often incorporates modern ingredients such as instant ramen noodles and sliced American cheese. Other ingredients may include ground beef, sliced sausages, baked beans, dropwort, onions, green onions, tteok, tofu, chili peppers, macaroni, garlic, mushrooms and other vegetables in season. I have a super easy way of making this soup. First, I sautee onions & kimchi in a big pot, then add in chopped spam & Vienna sausage. Then I pour water in & let it boil. My secret is …